Painting Magic Plane

Today in Calgary, WestJet, WestJet Vacations and Walt Disney Parks & Resorts (Canada) unveiled a custom-painted Boeing Next-Generation 737-800 series aircraft featuring Mickey Mouse as Sorcerer Mickey, a role the cartoon character first portrayed in the Walt Disney Productions film Fantasia, which came out in 1940.

The plane sets off for its inaugural flight on Tuesday, Dec. 3, flying from Calgary to Orlando, the home of Mickey Mouse and Walt Disney World Resort.

magic-plane-disney

After that, what WestJet has dubbed the “Magic Plane” will fly on WestJet’s domestic, trans-border and international network, which includes 39 flights per week from various Canadian cities to Orlando.

With today’s unveiling, WestJet released a list of fun facts about the Magic Plane, including the fact that cookies served on board are in the shape of Disney characters, that the design includes 36 different paint colors and that it took a team of 26 people 24 days working around the clock to paint the Magic Plane.

The airline added this teaser: the images on both sides of the aircraft are mirror images of each other, but “they are identical in all aspects but one.”

WestJet said in a statement that it will let passengers figure out the difference.

Harriet Baskas is the author of seven books, including Hidden Treasures: What Museums Can’t or Won’t Show You, and the Stuck at the Airport blog. Follow her on Twitter at @hbaskas.

From the USAtoday.com


Painting Magic Plane

From the romanceofflight.com

CALGARY, Dec. 2, 2013 /CNW/ – WestJet, WestJet Vacations and Walt Disney Parks & Resorts (Canada) today pulled back the curtain on their most exciting adventure yet — a custom-painted Boeing Next-Generation 737-800 series aircraft featuring Mickey Mouse in his most famous role, Sorcerer Mickey.

WestJet, WestJet Vacations and Walt Disney Parks & Resorts (Canada) first forged a relationship in 2004 based on a shared vision of creating memorable experiences for their guests. Known in the social media world as the #MagicPlane, the aircraft will perform its inaugural flight on December 3, 2013, from Calgary to Orlando, Florida, home of Walt Disney World Resort. Following the flight, the Magic Plane will fly throughout WestJet’s domestic, trans-border and international network.

WESTJET - WestJet soars to new heights with Magic Plane

“We are very proud of our work with Disney and everything we’ve done together over the years to enrich the lives of our guests,” said Gregg Saretsky, WestJet President and CEO. “With the Magic Plane, we are soaring to new heights, offering guests of all ages the chance to share the skies with one of the world’s most beloved and iconic figures. We also look forward to having fun with our guests on the ground as they see the Magic Plane flying over their communities and at airports across our expanding network.”

“Bringing this vision to life has been a true collaboration between our companies and it’s so exciting to see the final result — the aircraft is absolutely beautiful,” said Marlie Morrison, Managing Director, Marketing & Sales, The Walt Disney Company (Canada) Ltd. “WestJetters are the first point of contact for many of our Walt Disney World guests embarking on their memorable family vacation.  We have a great appreciation for WestJet, which shares a similar culture in bringing guests an exceptional experience from beginning to end.”

Fun facts about the Magic Plane:

  • The two sides of the aircraft are mirror images of each other in all aspects but one. We’ll leave it to our guests to decide what that is!
  • There are a total of 36 different paint colours on the aircraft.
  • It took a team of 26 people 24 days working around the clock to paint the Magic Plane.
  • The painting crew consumed more than 150 doughnuts over the 24 days.
  • The painting crew consisted of people from four countries, five states, two provinces and 12 cities.
  • The cookies that will be served on board are a special treat in the shape of Disney characters.
  • Over the next five years, the Magic Plane will fly more than 400,000 guests a total of nearly eight million kilometres.

WESTJET - WestJet soars to new heights with Magic Plane

On board the Magic Plane’s inaugural flight on December 3 will be 16 members of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada from various cities across the country. Along with club chaperones and WestJet volunteers, the group will travel to Orlando for three days of fun at Walt Disney World Resort, “pay-it-forward” charity activities, teambuilding and leadership training.

WestJet serves Orlando, home of Walt Disney World Resort, with a total of 39 flights per week during peak winter months from Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Hamilton, London, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Halifax, Moncton and St. John’s, Nfld.

WestJet Vacations offers a variety of vacation packages to the Walt Disney World Resort. Play, stay, dine and save when you book a five- to 15-night vacation package at select Walt Disney World Resort hotels that includes Magic Your Way tickets and a Disney dining plan. Offer is valid for bookings made by February 22, 2014, for travel between January 5 and April 12, 2014.


From the USAtoday.com

Air New Zealand’s Boeing 777-300 aircraft bearing the image of the mythical dragon Smaug from the Hobbit trilogy isn’t the only magic-themed jet making its debut today

AUCKLAND, New Zealand — New Zealand’s national airline on Monday unveiled a giant image of the dragon Smaug on one of its planes to celebrate the premiere of the second movie in the Hobbit trilogy.

Air New Zealand showed the 54-meter (177-foot) image that’s featured on both sides of a Boeing 777-300 aircraft. The plane is scheduled to fly to Los Angeles in time for the premiere of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, which screens Monday, Pacific Standard Time at the Dolby Theatre.

Behind-the-scene-stills-of-Air-New-Zealand’s-Hobbit-livery-graphic-installation-8

It was the first time fans got a chance to see director Peter Jackson’s interpretation of Smaug. In the first movie, the director revealed only the dragon’s eye.

The Hobbit trilogy was filmed in New Zealand and is based on the book of the same name by J.R.R. Tolkien.

The image is a decal, or giant sticker, produced by special effects studio Weta Digital, which also worked on the movie.

hobbit-dragon-plane

Air New Zealand spokesman Andrew Aitken said it intends to keep the decal on the plane for at least a year, until the opening of the third Hobbit movie. The airline also used a decal to celebrate the opening of the first movie.

New Zealand has sought to use the popularity of the movies as a way to market itself and boost tourism.

hobbit-dragon-plane-brandon-giacomin

Agata Oleksiak: 1978, Crotchet-Artist

A loop after a loop. Hour after hour my madness becomes crochet. Life and art are inseparable. The movies I watch while crocheting influence my work, and my work dictates the films I select. I crochet everything that enters my space. Sometimes it’s a text message, a medical report, found objects. There is the unraveling, the ephemeral part of my work that never lets me forget about the limited life of the art object and art concept. What do I intend to reveal? You have to pull the end of the yarn and unravel the story behind the crochet.

Olek Crotchet Artist

My work changes from place to place. I studied the science of culture. With a miner’s work ethic, I long to delve deeper and deeper into my investigations. My art was a development that took me away from industrial, close-minded Silesia, Poland. It has always sought to bring color and life, energy, and surprise to the living space. My goal is to produce new work and share it with the public. I intend to take advantage of living in NYC with various neighborhoods and, with my actions, create a feedback to the economic and social reality in our community.

Agata-Oleksiak-Crotchet-Artist Agata-Olek-02

Olek was born Agata Oleksiak in 1978 in Poland. In 2000, she received a BA in Cultural Studies from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland and relocated to New York City, where she is currently based. Olek’s work has been exhibited in galleries, museums and public spaces worldwide and featured in numerous publications such as TIME Magazine, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, New York Magazine, Newsweek/Daily Beast, Village Voice, Artinfo, PBS, CNN, CBS, ABC and NBC. Olek is the recipient of the Ruth Mellon Award for sculpture in 2004, In Situ Artaq award (France) in 2011, and a grant in 2011 from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC) for performance in public space. Olek’s residencies have included Sculpture Space in 2005, Instituto Sacatar (Brazil) in 2009 and AAI-LES in 2010. In 2008, Olek was the winner of the Apex Art competition, which aired on PBS. In 2010, the artist was commissioned by the Brooklyn Museum of Art for a one-day interactive performance installation. In 2012, Olek was part of the 40 Under 40: Craft Futures exhibition at the Smithsonian, for which her entire crocheted studio apartment was exhibite

Agata Olek: crochet artist

More about Olek’s crotchet art: http://oleknyc.com/

Olek on Facebook.com

David Walker: Street Artist

David-Walker-Street-Artist

Most people’s first job involved burgers and fries. David walker’s first job was creating t-shirt designs for The Prodigy. After that, he started designing record sleeves and party art before running his own street wear label called “Subsurface” for five years. It was only three years ago that he started painting. (Pretty impressive he’s accomplished all of that considering he’s broken his hand over 10 times!)

Once a fan of only black and white (with a little bit of pink thrown in for good measure), David now paints with in explosions of colour following his discovery of a little treasure box of spraypaint tucked away in a studio. His portraits are realistically surreal – the sort of images that make you stare for ages.

Which aspects of London life most influence your creativity and how?

I like the randomness of cities and the anticipation that anything can happen (good or bad) and that in turn you can make things happen. I have lived in small towns where there is just not the same sense of possibility, so this is very inspirational for me. I feel privileged to be making art full time and the speed in which this city can move pushes me forward.

David-Walker-Sarah

Faces are the main subject of your work. Who are the people you paint? Do you know them?

I don’t know them at all. I like that they’ve never met me and they don’t know they’re being painted. I use found photography, old magazines, the web, snapshots, anything that’s not staged by me. The fact that the subjects are unknown also allows people to make up there own narrative to the portraits.

David Walker street art

Tell us about your approach to your work, your unique “no brushes” style and your choice of fantastic vibrant colours.

I’m drawn towards the idea of making something beautiful out of what could be classed as lo-brow materials and methods. I don’t use brushes because I want the pieces to raise a question about graffiti and traditional painting as there can be strong preconceived ideas about both. People are normally quite surprised the work is made from spray paint and I think many are also surprised they actually like the work when its outside on a wall; suddenly they have connected with a scene that they previously had no time for at all.

As for colours, I’ve gone from two extremes. For two years, I only painted in black, white and pink (as it was cheaper and allowed me to concentrate on the subject more), then I came across a  box of random coloured spray paint that had been buried in the studio and started exploring as many colours as I could and all at once. It just felt right at the time and it’s been a lot of fun.

David-Walker-Street-Art

Favourite memory of painting on the walls of London?

Pretty much every time I paint outside, someone comes up to me at the end of the day and says “I saw you doing this earlier and I thought it was gonna be a right load of old crap, but I like it now. Nice one.” I think this is a great compliment.

Which piece are you most proud of at the moment and why?

I’m really happy with this one (above). There were probably at least ten times I wanted to throw it off the fire escape. It finally came together the night before it had to be delivered to a show, so I was glad she made it. It’s not been easy between me and her.

David-Walker-Street-Artist

You’re part of the Scrawl Collective. Tell us about this group and how you contribute.

It’s a bunch of artists with different styles and practises. We all dip in and out of it I guess. We do shows here and there, projects come up or one of us might get an idea and get others involved or sometimes nothing happens at all… It’s the 10th anniversary soon, so there are rumours we may be getting something together.

Do you prefer exhibiting in galleries or on the street?

They both have there positives and negatives. Walls are great because you have room to be very expressive and lots of people get to see the painting. With gallery work you get to spend time developing techniques and immerse yourself without anyone watching you. I try to balance both but I need to get outside more next year.

David-Walker-Street-Artist

Which other London-based artists do you admire?

So many for so many different reasons. At this very moment: Adam Neate, Will Barras, Polly Morgan, Christopher Moon, Arth Daniels

David-Walker-Street-Artist

Any big plans for 2011?

I may be doing a major solo show late 2011. I’m still toying with the idea, so we’ll see what happens.

Interview by Stephanie Sadler from Little London Observationalist.

More of David Walker’s street art: http://www.artofdavidwalker.com/